Zantac Ordered to be Removed from Shelves

Written By Thomas Lovecchio

Earlier this week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requested that companies making any version of Ranitidine, more commonly known by its brand name Zantac, be removed from the market. Zantac has been used to prevent and relieve heartburn associated with acid indigestion. The FDA stated that people should stop taking any over-the-counter Ranitidine tablets and to discard them. The FDA also stated that for those patients taking prescription Ranitidine to consult with their doctor about other options.

This decision from the FDA comes after finding that the carcinogen risk is greater than previously thought. Last year, the FDA stated the medication had low levels of “possible” cancer causing contaminants and patients could continue taking it. Now, the FDA has found that the levels of N-nitrosodimethylamine increase over time, and can increase further if stored at a high temperature. These findings are from long-term investigations involving the drug Zantac performed by the FDA. There have been a number of complaints against the company for years.

Due to this, Janet Woodcock, M.D., the director for the Center of Drug Evaluation and Research at the FDA stated, “since we don’t know how or for how long the product might have been stored, we decided that it should not be available to consumers and patients.” The FDA is still investigating this issue at this time.

If you are in possession of Zantac, it is important to not take the drug at this time to a safe drug drop-off site due to increased health concerns involving the novel coronavirus. It is recommended by the FDA that other safety measures, outlined on their website, should be taken until it is safe to visit one of the safe-sites to drop off the drug.

Atlee Hall is dedicated to holding negligent groups accountable, including manufacturers of unsafe products. Every manufacturing has a responsibility for delivering a product that is safe to consume or properly warns consumers of possible dangers.

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